Artist Bio: Auguste Rodin

Auguste Rodin[p] (born François-Auguste-René Rodin; 12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917) was a French sculptor. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture, he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition,[2] although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art. Sculpturally, he possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of Rodin's most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with the predominant figure sculpture tradition, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic. Rodin's most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modeled the human body with realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Rodin was sensitive of the controversy surrounding his work, but refused to change his style.

Successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community.

Diversity in Fine Nude Art

Contemporary approaches to nude art are diverse, not only in style but also in the meanings they attempt to convey.

Nude art has remained an essential focus of Western art since the Renaissance. Whether embracing or refashioning classical ideals, artists from the seventeenth century to the present have privileged the nude form and made it an endlessly compelling means of creative expression.

"If anything is sacred, the human body is sacred." - Walt Whitman I Sing the Body Electric

The Nude Art Gallery of Auguste Rodin